View of Part of Amman from the Citadel

Opening Doors to Jordan’s Rich Past and More.

As we recently discovered, Jordan is a sparkling jewel among nations. From a historic, cultural and culinary standpoint, it hits all the high notes for me. And the people are among the most friendly and kind you’ll find anywhere. Now, in case I was too subtle, I strongly suggest you plan a visit, and see for yourself. When you do, don’t forget to insure you optimize your experience by purchasing a Jordan Pass before you go.

By purchasing a Jordan Pass for a single price, you will gain access to nearly 40 UNESCO World Heritage sites, fascinating museums, castles and other portals to Jordan’s unique culture and history.

Before departing for Jordan, we downloaded and printed our Jordan Passes, and immediately saved 40 JDs (approximately $60) for the cost of our visa to enter the country. If you stay in Jordan for a minimum of three nights and four days – anything less makes no sense anyway – your Jordan Pass will cover the cost of the visa. By the time we arrived in Amman, we had already seen a more than 50 per cent return on the cost of our passes, and that was before we had even set foot in one historic site.

Where Our Jordan Pass Took Us

We spent a remarkable week in Jordan, traipsing through ancient ruins, medieval castles, desert landscapes, museums and more. Our Jordan Passes gave us access to some of the most stunningly beautiful, historically fascinating and just plain mind-boggling venues in the world. Here is some of what we saw:

The Citadel in Amman: Perched upon the highest hill In Amman, This site displays structures and artifacts from the Roman, Byzantine and Muslim periods. A guide isn’t necessary, but we hired one, and didn’t regret it.

Using the Jordan Pass to See the Temple to Hercules at the Amman Citadel (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
Using the Jordan Pass to See the Temple to Hercules at the Amman Citadel (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

Jerash: This Roman city was discovered 70 years ago beneath a sandy-covered plain. We spent hours wandering through this incredible outdoor museum gaping at the ruins of ancient structures, and marveling that they were there at all. If we return, a guide could certainly fill in a lot of blanks for us.

The Cardo at the Jerash Site Using the Jordan Pass to Enter (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
The Cardo at the Jerash Site Using the Jordan Pass to Enter (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

Madaba: This town is host to some of the most stunning mosaics in the world. Our Jordan Pass gave us access to all but one of the venues.

Part of a Mosaic in the Church of the Apostles in Madaba Using the Jordan Pass to Enter (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
Part of a Mosaic in the Church of the Apostles in Madaba Using the Jordan Pass to Enter (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

The Greek Orthodox Church charged 1 JD, but it was more than worth it to see the magnificent mosaic map inside.

Sunset Across the Desert in Wadi Rum Using the Jordan Pass to Enter the Area (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
Part of the Mosaic Map in St. Georges Greek Orthodox Church in Madaba – the Only Site that Did Not Accept the Jordan Pass (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

Petra: One of Jordan’s most famous archeological sites, it is the sight everyone comes to see, and for good reason. We spent three days absorbed in Petra’s breath-taking beauty and historical wonders.

The Treasury at Petra Using the Jordan Pass to Enter the Site (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
The Treasury at Petra Using the Jordan Pass to Enter the Site (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

We had a superb guide with us the entire time, and I recommend you hire one as well. A professional guide will give you insights and information you won’t find on the internet or in guide books.

Wadi Rum: Our venture into the desert began with our admission to the one road that runs into this area (covered by Jordan Pass). We spent a night in a Bedouin camp – not covered by the Jordan Pass, but well worth what we paid. The three traditional and delicious meals we enjoyed were just what the doctor ordered after two treks into the desert, bouncing around in the back of a pickup truck, and gazing at extraordinary rock formations and a magnificent sunset.

 Sunset Across the Desert in Wadi Rum Using the Jordan Pass to Enter the Area (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)
Sunset Across the Desert in Wadi Rum Using the Jordan Pass to Enter the Area (©simon@myeclecticimages.com)

We used our Jordan Passes to visit several more sites, and there are many more we want to visit on our next trip.

How to Get Your Jordan Pass

You can purchase your Jordan Pass on a secure website from the comfort of your home. The pass will then be Emailed to you. Print it out, and make sure you don’t leave home without it.

The Jordan Pass is available at three price levels. All three passes are identical, but vary in cost depending on the number of days you plan to spend at Petra. Each Jordan pass includes free entry to over 40 attractions within Jordan and free downloadable digital brochures. If you download your Jordan Pass prior to entering the country, and stay at least three nights and four days, your tourist entry visa fees will be waved.

  • The Jordan Wanderer costs 70 JD ($99), and includes one-day admission to Petra.
  • The Jordan Explorer costs 75 JD (1$06), and includes two-day admission to Petra.
  • The Jordan Expert costs 80 JD ($113), and includes three-day admission to Petra.

Since children under 12 are admitted free to most historic sites and museums in Jordan, purchasing a Jordan Pass for your children may not be necessary.

When you arrive at the airport in Amman, show your Jordan Pass at the conveniently located visa office, and your visa fees will be waived.

Your unactivated Jordan Pass will be valid for 12 months after purchase. Upon entering your first site or attraction, your pass is scanned and activated and then it is valid for use within two weeks. You can use your Jordan Pass for a single admission to each venue (except Petra, see above), and you will need to show your ID or passport upon entry.

We traveled with the Jordan Expert, and were delighted with how much we were able to see and do for a single price. Since we barely scratched the surface of all it had to offer, we won’t hesitate to take Jordan Passes with us on our next visit.

More details on the Jordan Pass, how to purchase it and how to use it can be found on the Jordan Pass website.

Disclaimer: A considerable portion of our Jordan experience, including our Jordan Passes, was generously hosted by Jordan Tourism Board. However, all opinions, as always, are entirely my own.

3 Comments

  • The Stunning Mosaics of Madaba: – Six Legs Will Travel

    Jun 09, 2017

    Reply

    […] it should be the Madaba Mosaic Map on the floor of the Greek Orthodox Church of St George. With a Jordan Pass, your admission to all the Madaba sites are covered with the exception of this church. But your […]

  • avatar image

    Jane Dempster-Smith

    Mar 31, 2017

    Reply

    Thanks for the information on the Jordan Pass. We should have done more research and found out before we travelled to Jordan a few years ago, the Jordan Pass would have saved us money. Now that we know about it we will definitely do it online before travelling there. We may travel to Jordan in 2018, planning for 2018 is still underway.

    • avatar image

      Penny

      Mar 31, 2017

      Reply

      I'm looking forward to comparing notes on Jordan when we meet up in Killarney. You'll definitely love that Jordan Pass when you go back next yea!

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